BACK IN THE DAY WITH LAKES DISTRICT MUSEUM

BACK IN THE DAY WITH LAKES DISTRICT MUSEUM

BACK IN THE DAY WITH LAKES DISTRICT MUSEUM 758 510 The Flyer Magazine

We usher in the beginning of summer and long hot days by continuing our series on local cribbies.

Families on Holiday

“Simple and uncomplicated”

The freedom while on holiday at the crib remains a strong memory for all cribbie children. The only restrictions on most children were clear-set boundaries stipulating how far they could wander from the crib, and the rule that they had to be home in time for meals. The town, the lake, the river and the hills were their playground. Although the children didn’t usually realise it, parents always had a reasonable idea of where their children were and who they were playing with. This was possible in the small, safe community nature of the Wakatipu.

“The children disappeared for the day. They tell me now of the horrific things they did. How they walked along the pipeline, how they went into the baths at night and had a swim, just for the devilment! They had a wonderful time.”
Cicely Morrison

“Relaxing on the deck chairs reading their books…”

Adults had a chance to relax and ‘recharge their batteries’ during their holidays. Once the lawns were mown (or scythed), the maintenance around the crib was done and the meals were organised, the adults found many opportunities to relax and soak in the hot Central Otago sun.

“I don’t think child-rearing was a science then; it just happened… I think the mums were just happy to pretty much stay put and just relax.”
Hillary Finnie

“Mum would bring a big sack of books, and she would read them… she just sat under the trees and read. Dad was a keen golf player so he would have played golf every morning, out early to avoid the heat.”
Deanne Andrews

Lakes District Museum Logo

Murray Collection – Mob at Crib.

‘rabble-rousers’ Arrowtown, Hunter Family Collection, 1962.

McLennans crib Arrowtown, Hunter Family Collection.