BACK IN THE DAY WITH LAKES DISTRICT MUSEUM

BACK IN THE DAY WITH LAKES DISTRICT MUSEUM

BACK IN THE DAY WITH LAKES DISTRICT MUSEUM 1500 1101 The Flyer Magazine

Queenstown Lakes District Holidaymakers Through The Ages – the Late Victorians

In this edition we’re beginning a look back in time at holidaymakers through the different eras of tourism locally.

Adventurous tourists have been visiting the Wakatipu and the Queenstown Lakes District since the very early days of settlement.

McKay’s Otago Almanac of 1870 was quite prophetic:

‘Did such a lake exist in Europe, it would be classed as one of the most picturesque and wildly grand and magnificent objects of interest to all wonder seekers and would attract tourists from all parts of the continent and America and we are not without hope that, ere many years, the scenery of New Zealand will attract visitors from Europe, and when such is the case, the Wakatipu will rank as one of the chief objects of interest’

Tourism initially focussed on the head of Lake Wakatipu at Kinloch and Glenorchy, and when the railway from Dunedin to Kingston was completed in the late 1870s Queenstown was more easily within reach.

Day trips to Arrowtown and Skippers, walks in the newly established Gardens in Queenstown, hiring boats for a trip on the lake and climbing Ben Lomond (an absolute must-do!) made the district a very popular destination. Healthy outdoor pursuits were encouraged and it was declared that:

‘…when New Zealand becomes recognised as the great sanatorium of the world Queenstown will take its place as not the least invigorating and pleasurable retreat’

Clutha Leader, 10 April 1885, pg 5.

The Lakes District Museum is open seven days a week
from 8.30am until 5pm.

Photos and source: Lakes District Museum.

Lakes District Museum Logo

Picnicking group up Ben Lomond, 1908.

Horse team and carriage on the Skippers Road.

Skippers Coach leaving Queenstown,1890’s.